Category: News

“GLOW” Renewed For Season 2

Exciting news Betty fans! GLOW has been renewed by Netflix for a second season.

‘GLOW’: Netflix Renews Women’s Wrestling Comedy For Season 2
Netflix has another keeper from Jenji Kohan on its hands. The Internet network has renewed new 1980s wrestling comedy GLOW for a 10-episode second season.

Kohan, who is behind one of Netflix’s signature series, Orange Is the New Black, executive produces GLOW, created/executive produced by Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch.

Like Orange Is the New Black, GLOW, inspired by the short-lived but beloved show from the ’80s, has been a critical and pop culture hit. Set in 1985 Los Angeles, it follows Ruth Wilder (Alison Brie), a struggling out-of-work actress as she auditions for, trains and eventually makes TV’s first women’s wrestling show.

Flahive and Mensch, who serve as showrunners, executive produce with Kohan and Tara Herrmann.

GLOW is the fourth Netflix comedy to debut in 2017 and get a second-season renewal. It joins One Day at a Time, Santa Clarita Diet and Dear White People. One 2017 Netflix comedy has been canceled, Girlboss.

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Betty Reads “A Lost Child, but Not Mine”

Modern Love Podcast: Betty Gilpin Reads ‘A Lost Child, but Not Mine’

Modern Love: The Podcast | “A Child Lost, but Not Mine”

Episode 77 | “A Child Lost, but Not Mine”

On this week’s podcast, the “Glow” actress Betty Glipin reads Kassi Underwood’s story of abortion, regret and coveting an ex’s child.

On this week’s podcast, the actress Betty Gilpin reads “A Lost Child, but Not Mine,” about a woman who imagines the course her life might have taken had she chosen to see her pregnancy to term.

Kassi Underwood, the writer, expanded her essay into the memoir “May Cause Love.” Follow her on Twitter.

Ms. Gilpin stars in the Netflix series “GLOW,” about the outsiders who get cast in a women’s wrestling show. You can find her on Twitter.

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“GLOW” Sets Up a Multi-Season Run

How ‘GLOW’ Sets Up a Multi-Season Run

The Netflix series’ co-creators, along with stars Alison Brie and Betty Gilpin, look ahead for THR.

[Warning: This story contains spoilers from the entire first season of Netflix’s GLOW.]

The first season of GLOW was designed to feel like an origin story.

Netflix’s female wrestling series took its time introducing and forming its characters — both in and out of the ring — during its first nine episodes. The story built to a big finale in the tenth and final half-hour: creating the pilot episode for what would go on to become the first-ever female wrestling TV series.
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Betty’s Essay for Glamour.com

‘Glow’ Star Betty Gilpin: What It’s Like to Have Pea-Sized Confidence With Watermelon-Sized Boobs

Growing up, I was a self-loathing Igor who carried the queen’s books. My job was to be the sarcastic sherpa, quietly providing the farce and adoration then becoming part of the wall when cued. I don’t know when it was, but at some point I realized the obvious truth that I was a hideous goblin under a bridge, that the sound of my voice was like audible feces, and the presence of my body in a room was like bringing a moose carcass to brunch. I adopted the posture that Katie Holmes had as Joey in Dawson’s Creek: shoulders as high to one’s ears as possible, as if I could shrug my existence away. (To this day, I legitimately blame Dawson’s for my back problems.) I ate cucumbers and saltines—not because I wanted to look a certain way, but because I was so sad my appetite disappeared. It was the perfect costume; I was the smallest person in the room inside the smallest person in the room.

And then puberty was like, WA-BAM. Physically, I went from Justin Bieber to Jessica Rabbit. I gained 30 pounds of thigh, booty, and certified American jugs. And I quickly learned big boobs have the effect of announcing your presence in a room as if you’re cradling Gilbert Gottfried singing the opening to the “Circle of Life.” Pretty hard to disappear into the wall, which is what I’d taught myself to do before my tits grew to the size of pudding-filled manatee pups.

So in my 20s, I had to work doubly hard to disappear. The word “sorry” escaped my mouth a hundred times a day. I spent most of my time at parties trying to convince women that I hated myself, then had social hangovers about those conversations.
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Betty Joins “Isn’t It Romantic”

Betty Gilpin Joins Rebel Wilson In New Line’s ‘Isn’t It Romantic’
EXCLUSIVE: Betty Gilpin, who co-stars in Netflix’s upcoming women’s wrestling dramedy GLOW, has been set to join the cast of Isn’t It Romantic, a New Line Cinema comedy toplined by Rebel Wilson. The pic, to be directed by Todd Strauss-Schulson, has a February 14, 2019 release date. Liam Hemsworth, Adam Devine and Priyanka Chopra are also already aboard.

Wilson stars as Natalie, a cynical woman who doesn’t believe in love, who wakes up one day to find herself trapped inside a romantic comedy. Gilpin will play Natalie’s assistant Whitney, one of her best friends. But in Natalie’s alternate universe Whitney is Natalie’s mortal enemy and becomes the assistant from hell.

Erin Cardillo wrote the original script, which Dana Fox and Katie Silberman are rewriting. Todd Garner, Grant Scharbo, Jeremy Stein and Gina Matthews are producing.

Gilpin, whose credits include Nurse Jackie and Masters Of Sex, recently was seen on Starz’s American Gods. GLOW, which stars Alison Brie and is created and executive produced by Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch, premieres on Netflix on June 23.

Gilpin is repped by ICM Partners and David Williams Management.

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Betty Joins “GLOW”

‘G.L.O.W.’: Betty Gilpin To Co-Star In Netflix’s 1980s Wrestling Comedy Series

Nurse Jackie alumna Betty Gilpin is set to co-star opposite Alison Brie in G.L.O.W., Netflix’s 10-episode straight-to-series comedy executive produced by Orange Is The New Black creator Jenji Kohan.

Created by Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch , G.L.O.W. was inspired by the real story of the 1980s female wrestling league. Set in Los Angeles and showcasing big hair and body slams, the series tells the fictionalized story of Ruth (Brie), an out-of-work, struggling  actress who finds one last attempt to live her dreams when she’s thrust into the glitter and spandex world of women’s wrestling via a weekly series about female wrestlers. Gilpin will play Debbie Eagan, a former soap star who left show business to have a baby, only to be sucked back in when her picture-perfect life is not what it seems.

Kohan and Tara Herrmann executive produce, with Flahive and Mensch serving as showrunners.

The Reagan-era female wrestling league G.L.O.W. (Gorgeous Ladies Of Wrestling), a female answer to the male-dominated World Wrestling Federation, was showcased in the eponymous kitschy, Las Vegas-based syndicated TV series, which ran for four seasons, featuring sketches, songs and wrestling.

Gilpin recently did arcs on Showtime’s Masters Of Sex, CBS’ Elementary, PBS’ Mercy Street and the upcoming American Gods on Starz. She is repped by ICM Partners and David Williams Management.

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Betty Will Appear in “Masters of Sex” Season 4

Niecy Nash & Betty Gilpin Respond To ‘Masters Of Sex’ For Season 4

Showtime’s historical drama about the duo who pioneered research into human sexual responses has a pair of new faces for Season 4 arcs. Niecy Nash will play an Alcoholics Anonymous veteran and Betty Gilpin is joining the practice of William Masters (Michael Sheen).

The next season of Masters Of Sex, which also stars Lizzy Caplan, will begin in 1968 and take viewers into the “swinging ’70s,” during which time the characters will take on new partners both professionally, personally and sexually. Nash will play Louise Bell, a local AA chairperson running Masters’ court-ordered daily meetings. She fervently believes in AA’s message, and uses it to push Masters to reevaluate his life. Gilpin will play Nancy, a former medical student of Barton’s (Beau Bridges) who partners with Masters, adding a second MD to the practice.

Production on Season 4 is underway in Los Angeles for a September 11 premiere. Caitlin FitzGerald and Annaleigh Ashford also star. The series from Sony TV is executive produced by Michelle Ashford, Sarah Timberman, Carl Beverly, Amy Lippman and Judith Verno.

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